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The Bahamas Are Still Devastated From Hurricane Dorian. A Tropical Storm Could Make Things Worse

Florida

A possible tropical cyclone is bearing down on the Bahamas communities that were decimated just days ago by the Category 5 storm Hurricane Dorian.

 

Although the potential storm isn’t expected to be near Dorian’s level, it may still wreak havoc on islands such as Great Abaco and Grand Bahama, where at least 50 people were killed during Dorian. Tropical storm warnings have been issued for the northwestern Bahamas, and a tropical storm watch has been issued for parts of Florida.

 

The Abaco Islands suffered some of the most severe damage during Hurricane Dorian. Witnesses on the largest island, Great Abaco, at the time of the storm said that many homes were flooded, damaged or completely destroyed by the storm’s wind, storm surge and heavy rain, and some residents were left without food, water and proper sanitation. Businesses and island infrastructure were damaged during the storm, and some island residents resorted to looting in order to survive.

 

Grand Bahama seems to have suffered somewhat less damage, although witnesses said that the storm destroyed many homes and other buildings. A local news reporter from WPTV in Florida posted a video of an airport on the island on Sept. 6, which showed that the airport’s tarmac and buildings were in shambles.

 

Dennis Feltgen, a meteorologist and the communications and public affairs officer for the National Hurricane Center, tells TIME that the storm may bring tropical storm force winds and heavy rain.

 

“This is not, fortunately, in the league of Dorian. But as far as the Bahamas are concerned, heavy rainfall and tropical storm force winds is not helping at all. It seems like nature’s added a little insult to everything,” Feltgen says.

 

 

What is the storm’s projected path?

 

The National Hurricane Center warns that there are “favorable” environmental conditions for a tropical depression or tropical storm to form later on Friday or on Saturday.

 

A tropical storm warning has been issued for the northwestern Bahamas, including the islands that were most affected by Hurricane Dorian—the Abaco Islands and Grand Bahama. The warning excludes the Andros archipelago, which includes the largest island in the Bahamas.

 

A tropical storm watch has also been issued in Florida from the Jupiter Inlet in the state’s southeast to the Flagler-Volusia county line.

 

As of Friday, the disturbance was about 280 miles east-southeast from the city of Freeport on Grand Bahama Island.

 

Later on Friday, the storm system is expected to move over the central and northwestern Bahamas, and then to go along or over Florida’s east coast on Saturday, the National Hurricane Center says.

 

What effects will the storm have?

 

The northwestern Bahamas are expected to experience tropical storm conditions later on Friday. Through Sunday, the Bahamas are expected to receive 2 to 4 inches of rain with as much as 6 inches of rain in some areas, Feltgen says.

 

“This would make a very difficult situation even more difficult,” Feltgen says of the communities impacted by Dorian.

 

The storm may have one “silver lining,” Feltgen says—unlike Dorian, it’s not expected to cause major storm surge in the northwestern Bahamas.

 

Tropical storm conditions are also possible in Florida on Saturday and Saturday night. The region from central Florida to South Carolina is expected to receive between 2 and 4 inches of rain.

 

Feltgen said that people in the U.S. should keep a careful eye on the forecast, as a storm system like this may shift. He adds that the severity of the winds in Florida will depend on how close the storm moves to the mainland.

Original story from time