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Tropical Depression 27 forms in Atlantic, TS Epsilon expected to form soon

climate change

Tropical Depression 27 formed Monday morning in the Atlantic and has odds of growing into the 26th named storm of the year: Tropical Storm Epsilon.

TD 26 is 720 miles southeast of Bermuda and has maximum sustained winds of 35 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center’s 8 a.m. update.

The storm is stationary and isn’t expected to move very much throughout Monday, but it should begin moving northwestward Tuesday, continuing that movement throughout the rest of the week.

The system has meandered in the mid-Atlantic for several days where tropical conditions are not ideal for the system’s development, however, strength is expected to gradually increase during the next 72 hours and the storm is forecast to become Tropical Storm Epsilon by Monday night or sometime Tuesday.

Once it becomes tropical storm, hurricane specialists forecast the storm to keep gaining strength and develop into a Category 1 hurricane within three days. It is then expected to gain maximum sustained winds speeds up to 85 mph within five days.

Meanwhile, the NHC is also expecting a low-pressure system to form in a couple of days over the southwestern Caribbean Sea. After it does, small development is possible in the later part of the week as the system moves slowly northwestward over the western Caribbean. The system has a 20% chance of developing over the next five days.

Whichever system first develops into a tropical storm would be the 26th named storm of the year, and given the Greek letter Epsilon as its name.

The official last day of the hurricane season is Nov. 30.

 

This article was originally published on  orlandosentinel.com

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